Archive for the ‘vegetarian’ Category

Even Better Bok Choy

April 24, 2012

Good, better, best.
Never let it rest.
Until your good is better
and your better is best.

Cooked Bok Choy

With all the Bok Choy in my garden, I had to keep searching for a low sodium way to prepare it or else keep giving it away. I found this recipe over at allrecipes.com and there are a few differences other than it calls for no salt at all. With a cooking time of 15 minutes, it is a lot longer than any of the other stir fry recipes I had seen. It also includes capers, vinegar and lemon juice to essentially give this bland vegetable some more flavor beyond the ginger and garlic. Well of course I wasn’t going to buy red wine vinegar just to test the recipe and with a lime tree outside my kitchen door, I thought it senseless to buy a lemon when I use lime for every recipe that calls for lemon and like the taste. So with these very minor changes, the Bok Choi turned out excellent and I will be eating more of it and testing other low sodium recipes with a little longer cooking time.

Ingredients:

6 big leaves bok choy
3 tablespoons olive oil
1/4 cup water
1 T capers
1 T minced garlic
1 T minced fresh ginger root
1 T balsamic vinegar
1 dash fresh lime juice, or to taste

Method:

1. Remove the leaves from the stems of the bok choy. Cut the stems into bite-sized chunks and shred the leaves.

2. Heat the olive oil in large skillet over medium heat and add the stems to the pan

3. Cook the bok choy stems in the oil until slightly tender, about 3 minutes.

4. Add the water and chopped leaves and cook until the water is gone or about 10 more minutes.

5. Stir in the capers, garlic, and ginger and cook 1 minute more.

6. Sprinkle the vinegar and lime juice over the bok choy and remove from heat;

7. Serve immediately.

I used this as a substitute for my mid day salad and am planning a smoked turkey and Bok Choy dinner now that I find I prefer the taste of well cooked bok choy.

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Arugula Party Dip

April 15, 2012

I am not quite done with my detox but I am satisfied with the results as I am now about 5 pounds in 14 days with no suffering or exotic pills, packaged meals or special exercise. I am also nearing the completion of my book. For those who would like to follow my daily activities, I post on Facebook.

During my detox from Alcohol, I still eat and exercise and during those periods of procrastination from sitting at my desk, I seek out and cook, new meals. The only reason I don’t usually report on the recipes is that it takes even more time away from my primary goals. This recipe is simple and involves no cooking so as I return to normal on Wednesday, I am taking the time to post it.

For those who don’t know, arugula (rocket) is a peppery kind of lettuce which I happen to like. It is also another one of those green vegetables which is growing like a weed in my garden and as I was surfing the net, I stumbled upon a Spinach Dip Recipe at Eat at E’s. Since I don’t have spinach growing wild, I made note that I would probably try the recipe using Arugula.

Chef Enes said to let him know how it turns out because he likes Arugula but had worries that it might yellow with age. Well the dip never turned yellow because it was gone in two days and it was good. I am not sure if it was as good as the original as I left out the salt, was generous with the red pepper and cut back on the Mayonnaise and substituted Dijon mustard to reduce the fat content. I always modify recipes to reduce fat and salt. Some times it works, some times it doesn’t. This time it did.

I am glad I made the trip to Eat at E’s because his recipe inspired me to try this dip recipe which turned out quite well and added more flavor to my vegetable snacks.

Arugula Party Dip

Ingredients:

1/2 cup packed fresh devained arugula

Top of 2 green onion chopped

1/4 tsp pepper

2 T mayonnaise

2 T Dijon Mustard

2 T sour cream

1/2 tsp lime

sprinkle red pepper flakes on top

salt to taste

Method:

1. Place all ingredients in blender except for red pepper and salt.

2. Blend on low speed

3. Serve with fresh vegetable.

This is one of those recipes that should be prepare 5-6 hours in advance to smooth out the flavors.

Jeera Aloo (Cumin Potatoes) – Coffeepot Style

February 19, 2012

 

Jeera Aloo (Cumin Potatoes)

While I had been lazy in 2011, Monica has been busy Running her Dinner Club, appearing on Television and even publishing new recipes. Of course as I returned to creative cooking and eating, I was delighted to find a powerful vegan dish, Jeera Aloo or cumin potatoes and decided to adapt it to my coffeepot.

I like my food spicy and this boiled potato has eight different spices and I decided to leave out the salt. That was a poor but correctable decision as I added the salt prior to eating at the table and it perked up all the other flavors. But then, I really should have know better than trying to second guess Monica of the Spice Diary. The next time I cook this meal, I will add a piece of scotch bonnet pepper as I like the traditional Caribbean hot pepper flavor and know it will merge very well with the rest of the flavors.

Jeera Aloo (Cumin Potatoes) – Coffeepot Style

 Ingredients:

1 large or two small potatoes – I used red and didn’t bother pealing them.

1/2 tsp salt or according taste

½ tsp paprika powder

1/2 tsp dried mango powder (amchur)

1/2 tsp garam masala

1 smallonion, thinly sliced

3 tbsp olive oil

1 tsp cumin seeds

1/2 tsp mustard seeds

pinch of asafoetida (optional)

1 T dried coriander, chopped

Instructions:

1. Put cubed bite-sized potato and a ½ tsp of salt in the coffeepot and pass water through the unit to cover the potatoes.

2. After unit is done perking, cover the pot with foil and cook until tender. (1-2 hours, test with a fork.)

3. Drain and set cooked potatoes aside.

4. Add salt, paprika, mango powder and garam masala in a plastic bag and mix well.

5. Put cooked potatoes in bag and shake until evenly coated .

Coating the potatoes with the spice blend

 

6. Heat oil in coffeepot.

7. Add cumin, mustard seeds, asafoetida, curry leaves. When they begin to sizzle, add the onions and 2T water. Cook covered until onions glaze over.

8. Stir well and add the potatoes.

9. Mix the potatoes and add the coriander.

10. Warm for about 1 hour.

I skipped meat for the day and had the potatoes and a Tomato and Arugula Salad which is all I needed to feel full and get a good night’s sleep.

Excellent Vegan Microgreen Soup – Is this a first?

September 11, 2011
microgreen soup

Microgreen Soup

When I Googled “microgreen soup” and “cooked microgreens”, I found nothing in the first category and only limited information in the second. I was searching because I stumbled across the microgreen concept and found that I could grow a crop of microgreens hydroponically without mess or much effort all year long. I could keep several tray going and have fresh greens daily.

The problem was, microgreens wouldn’t bring much added value to my life unless I could discover unique uses. I tried broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage and arugula and the only salad green that was a keeper in my mind was arugula because it substituted for something I was already eating a lot of. The others were OK, but since I buy reasonably priced and hydroponically grown cucumbers, watercress, Chinese spinach, and arugula, the other microgreens don’t add much to the salad except as a garnish. Also, since I live alone, a lot of what I grew was going bad.

I love soups of all kinds and I have fond memories of the children’s story Stone Soup and have made it with magic stones with my daughter and granddaughters. I let them choose the smoothest magic stone they can find which is then washed prior to cooking.

This recipe is as close as possible to making a fantastic soup out of next to nothing and I used wilted root cellar crops that would eventually go bad. This is actually two recipes as the blended soup is excellent for lunch or a side dish. I just added the potatoes and carrots as I wanted a heartier soup for my dinner.

Excellent Vegan Microgreen Soup

Ingredients

1 T. olive oil

1 medium onion chopped

2 garlic cloves diced

2 celery stalks diced

1 oz. Rum

3 cups water

6-8 oz. microgreens (mixed broccoli and cauliflower)

1 T. Dried parsley

½ tsp. Thyme

1 tsp. salt

1 large potato cubed

2 carrots coined.

Directions

This recipe can be scaled up and made in either a Crockpot or coffeepot. Since I am cooking for one, I used my coffeepot.

  1. Add oil to pot and put on hot plate of coffeemaker.
  2. Chop onions, dice celery and garlic add to the pot
  3. Add rum
  4. Add three cups of water to the coffeemaker and let it drip into the pot. This will heat up everything quicker.
  5. When onions are soft (about 1 hour), add the microgreens and cook for 1 hour more.
  6. Add spices and salt to the pot. Mix thoroughly.
  7. Place in blender and blend until the consistency of pea soup.

Taste this soup right now! It is fantastic!.

  1. Coin carrots and add to pot.
  2. Dice potatoes into ½ inch cubes and add to pot.
  3. Cook for 4 more hours and serve.

This should have been enough for two meals but I enjoyed it so much, I only had a cup left over which wasn’t enough for a full meal. I really love this soup. It has only natural ingredients with no artificial thickeners, or bullion of unknown origin.

Tostones – Puerto Rican Twice Fried Plantains

January 18, 2011

Tostones and Mojo

I have eaten and enjoyed Tostones for the past 40 years of my life but never made them as they are twice fried plantains and that just sounded like a lot of work. A couple of weeks ago there was an interview in the newspaper with Angie Morales of Villa Morales and she said she is so used to cooking them that she could do a batch in 10 minutes from start to finish. I decide to give it a try because I have been in her kitchen when she was making them for a large group and have seen other local cooks making them for smaller groups.

For those who don’t know, Tostones are a fried disc of plantain which is about two inches across and gets enlarged from the standard size during the preparation. They are extremely crispy and great with salt, ketchup, or the more traditional Mojo which is a garlic sauce you make yourself. The starting fruit is an unripe green Plantain. They are great as an appetizer, or as a side dish or snack. Think “French Fried Potatoes” and you will get a good idea of all the ways that children and adults enjoy Tostones.

Ingredients:
Plantain
Frying Oil
Salt

Directions:
1.Peal Plantain, use a knife to start.
2.Slice ½ to ¾ inch thick. (Thicker slices, cut on a diagonal will give a bigger finished Tostone)
3.Fry 2 minutes per side at 350 Fahrenheit (Hot Oil but not smoking) until just tender to the fork.

Fry Half Inch Chunks

4.Remove and drain on paper towel
5.Press flat with palm or flat object. I used a beer mug. They should end up ¼ inch thick. (Sorry about this Picture) If necessary, use a fork to separate them from the bottom of the mug.

Press Flat with Beer Mug

6.Return them to the pan and fry a couple more minutes on each side until golden brown.

Refry Compressed Discs

7.Sprinkle with salt and serve hot with Mojo.

Mojo (Traditional Garlic Sauce)
Ingredients:
½ cup Extra Virgin Olive Oil
2 heaping Tablespoons Crushed Garlic (6 large cloves)
2 Tablespoons Lime or Lemon Juice
½ tsp salt.
Optional:
1 Scotch bonnet hot pepper
¼ cup more oil.

Blend all the ingredients in a blender until a smooth liquid. and serve. The traditional Mojo has no hot pepper but since I like hot pepper, I added a whole one and some more oil and blended it until it had the texture of mayonnaise. If I were serving this to guests, I would definitely leave out the hot pepper and serve it in the traditional manner.

Acorn Squash and Pasta – A work in Progress

January 12, 2011

Acorn Squash And Pasta

I love everything about acorn squash. I love it baked in a half shell with butter and brown sugar, I love it as a base for a vegan or vegetarian soup. I even love the way it looks and and because of the affordable price I usually forget I have one and buy an another one before I use the one I have. Because I love to have a variety in my diet, I started searching for new ways to cook it and stumbled upon a Rachael Ray recipe for Penne-Wise Pumpkin Pasta.

Seem that this was not a crowd favorite as most people called it bland and the only ones who gave it high enough ratings to bring the average up to 3 stars out of 5 had altered the recipe and added meat to the meal because it wasn’t vegetarian to start with. Still it was an interesting concept and it got me to thinking?

What if I used Italian spices instead of pumpkin pie spices? What if I used a acorn squash instead of pumpkin? What if I used vegetable broth instead of chicken broth? What if I used ricotta instead of milk and Hot pepper instead of Pepper sauce? The only way to find out was give it a try.

Ingredients:

2 T olive oil

3 shallots diced (optional)

3 coves garlic minced

1 thin slice Scotch Bonnet Pepper

1 onion diced

2 tsp Parsley

6-8 fresh basil leaves or 1 tsp dry

½ tsp thyme

1 bay leaf

1 acorn squash

1 Can Vegetable Broth

1 cup ricotta

½ tsp salt

Grated Parmesan to sprinkle on top

Directions:

  1. Cook the acorn squash until soft, and remove pulp from shell and set aside.
  2. In olive oil, simmer shallots, garlic, hot pepper, onion, parsley, basil, time and bay until onion glazes over.
  3. Add broth and acorn squash and let simmer for an hour.
  4. Remove Bay and hot pepper and blend in blender.
  5. Add ricotta, bring to temperature and serve over pasta. (I used a bowl with extra sauce).

Well the jury is out on this recipe. Believe it or not I found it bland while my vegetarian friend loved it. I tried it before I added the ricotta, and the flavors were actually bolder. I do believe this will have a better chance of me cooking it again as a vegan meal with the addition of diced tomatoes and am actually looking forward to the challenge of getting a bold flavor out an acorn squash and pasta meal. I love my acorn squash and would like to eat it more often if I can find different ways.

Paneer Masala

January 10, 2011

Paneer Masala

There is that old saying about what do you do when God gives you lemons and of course the answer is make Lemonade which was covered in a previous post. Now the next question is what do you do when your Grandchildren come to visit and leave you with a full gallon of milk. The answer is not quite so obvious but it is”Make paneer” and once again thanks to Monica, there is a good recipe online that works well.

I refer you to her site because while I made it slightly differently, I ended up without pictures but the paneer which is not locally available tasted great so I decided on a simple Paneer Masala, once again from Monica. Now probably the biggest change I made to the recipe was to cut the amount of paneer used in half because four ounces was all that came out of the half gallon of low fat milk. So what I had is what I used.

The other change was partially logical and partially pragmatic. Since I cut the amount of paneer in half, I cut the turmeric used to season it in half. Locally, turmeric is $6.99 for less than an ounce and that provided another incentive to the logical reduction. I also cut the salt to season the paneer in half because overall there is still a lot of salt in the rest of the recipe.

From a pragmatic perspective, I used a full tin of drained diced tomatoes instead of half and the final change was to substitute a dried red chili for the unavailable green one. Well the meal was fantastic and my friends loved it. Perhaps this is true because none of us had ever eaten very much Indian food in general or Monica’s in particular. However I really can’t imagine a meal much more flavorful than this one was.

If I had thought of it at all, I would have made an additional change and that was to use all of the peas in the recipe. It’s about a week since I made this meal and all the paneer, sauce and tomatoes are gone but the other half of the can of peas still lingers in my refrigerator. Oh well, I am still learning to think beforehand about preparing meals for one or two and I hate wasting a thing or building a meal around one minor ingredient that I rarely use. Next time I will add it all. And this is good enough that there will be a next time.

Ingredient:

To season the paneer:

1 tbsp olive oil

1 block of paneer (1/4 pound), cut into 1 inch cubes

1 tsp cumin seeds

1/2 tsp turmeric powder

1/2 Tsp Salt

To make the Marsala:

4 tbsp olive oil

2 tsp salt

1 tbsp grated ginger

3 cloves garlic

1 medium onion

1 tsp paprika

1 tsp garam masala

1/2 tsp turmeric powder

1 green chilli

handful of fresh chopped coriander

1 tin plum tomatoes drained but retain liquid

1/2 to 1 can peas drained

1 small can mushroom pieces

Directions:

1.  Heat 1 tbsp olive oil. Add 1 tsp cumin seeds. Once they begin to sizzle, add the paneer cubes. Now add 1/2 tsp salt and 1/2 tsp turmeric powder.

2.  Stir occasionally until paneer turns golden on all sides. Remove from heat and hold for later.

Spiced and Cooked Paneer

3. In a blender, add the onion, garlic, ginger and chilli. If done in a blender you will have to add the olive oil to the blender instead of the pan. Also add 2 tsp salt, 1 tsp paprika, 1/2 tsp turmeric, 1 tsp garam masala and the coriandor. Process until finely ground.

Blend the Masala and Oil Paste

4.  In a pan, heat the masala containing the oil. Cook on medium heat until golden brown, about 1/2 hour.

5.  Add 1 tin drained plum tomatoes and cook for 15 minutes. Once the oil begins to separate from the masala, add the peas. Then add the mushrooms and the previously prepared paneer. Stir

6.  Add the saved tomato juice so it is just covering the vegetables and paneer and bring to temperature.

7.  Serve with rice.

This is another full flavored Vegetarian meal from the kitchen of Monica as adapted for my coffeepot or your crockpot.

Puerto Rican Green Banana Salad or Escabeche de Guineos

January 6, 2011

Green Fig Side Salad

The first two people who served me this side dish were of Puerto Rican extraction so I called it Puerto Rican Green Banana Salad or Escabeche de Guineos. Actually, it is common throughout the Caribbean because it evolved by eating green bananas as a starchy substance when times are tough. In addition to being called Green Banana in English, it is also referred to as Green Fig Salad although there is no relationship with Figs as most Americans understand the word. This is not to be confused with plantains which appear to be big green bananas as this salad is made from regular unripe starchy bananas.

Green Fig

I would imagine this side dish evolved from an era when you had fields of bananas and none ripe and nothing to feed the kids for lunch. The solution is simple, boil the green bananas and toss them in a salad with whatever you have. The recipes are more standard now but there are still personal and regional variations. Of course, the source for my recipe is once again my friend Chino who shared his kitchen with anybody who liked to drink beer and keep him company while he was cooking. This was not as difficult as going to a culinary college so I found myself joining him quite frequently.

At a Crucian Breakfast or Brunch, you will traditionally find a salt-fish dish, johnnycake, various fritters and Green Banana Salad. After that the variety of side dishes for breakfast is an endless combinations of old fashioned foods. At other meals Green Fig can be served as a side dish from a bowl like seasoned rice or any other vegetable or can be garnished and served as a salad as above. Eating it on new years will bring you green for the year.

Ingredients:

2 Green Bananas

¼ cup olive oil

2 T. distilled white vinegar

2 T. lemon juice

10 sliced green Spanish Olives stuffed with pimento

1T. Crushed Garlic

1 tsp. capers

1 Onion thin sliced and separated into rings.

½ green pepper cut into thin rings

1 bay leaf

½ tsp. salt

¼ tsp. Pepper

Directions:

  1. Cut the ends off the green bananas and score it lengthwise. Try not to go deeper than the skin as a deep cut will discolor. Leave the skins on and boil for 20-25 minutes on the stove top or cut in half put in coffeepot and run 10 cups of water through the coffeemaker let stay on hot plate covered with foil for 1 hour.

    Prepare Green Banana for Cooking

  2. Remove skin from the cooked bananas and slice into pieces – your choice I have seen them cut from 3/8 inch discs to 1 inch long pieces. Some people serve them whole without any dressing. They are all good. I used about ½ inch pieces.

    Boiled Pealed Green Fig

  3. Put all the other ingredients in a bowl and mix with a fork until evenly distributed.
  4. Add bananas and gently toss until all are coated with the dressing and blended with the other ingredients.

    Tossed Salad Ready to Serve

  5. Serve from the Bowl or make as a side salad.
  6. For the simple salad plate,  I used a bed of lettuce and fresh ripe tomatoes locally grown.

Winter is our strongest growing season for vegetables as that is when it is cool enough to grow a lot of North American summer crops. We have fantastic tomatoes and cucumbers but since the salad was already white, I left the cucumbers out for appearance but if you like cucumbers and have them on hand, why not include them?

Rich and Bold West Indian Vegan Curry

January 5, 2011

Vegan Curry

I am now cooking vegetarian or vegan 3-4 times a week out of respect for my friend Vanice who prefers meatless meals. When she comes to help me out I make sure there is something she will enjoy eating in my refrigerator and therefor make a little more of the vegetarian combinations. Friends have learned to trust my cooking because I cater to their desires and never lie about the ingredients no matter how minor the uses of a non vegetable ingredient. Locally vegetarian meals are fairly bland and depend more on the freshness of the vegetables than the creativity of the cook and range from good to just plain awful.

Vanise has developed a taste for the rich flavors of Indian curry, West Indian curry and Italian Vegetarian meals. My rule of thumb when making a vegetarian meals is if it contains a dairy product, I will make it vegetarian. However, if the meal is 90% vegetarian and has no dairy products as necessary ingredients, I will make it Vegan. Usually this can be accomplished by using olive oil instead of butter or vegetable broth instead of chicken stock.

My daughter’s husband loves curry and learns to cook those things he likes. As a family they made curry and it was a disappointment. My daughter called to ask about the missing spice flavor and lack of rich color and we started talking.  Of course, the color could be built using turmeric, and the flavor could be built using cumin, cilantro and garlic, but then the obvious answer to what went wrong is you are are actually building your own curry powder so throw out the garbage you though was curry powder and find Chief Curry Powder which is a product of Trinidad and Tobago which has a higher percentage of Asian Indians than any other Caribbean Island.

It takes a good curry powder to make good West Indian curry and life is that simple. Well she drove across DC and found a nice little West Indian Market and purchased her Chief Curry Powder and had no other problems making good Curry. The following recipe shows that I still spice the pot but essentially, I am trying to make an already good meal slightly better. The package recipe also recommends Chives, Onion, Garlic, Pepper and Salt. Chives are not usually available, I like the flavor of hot pepper and I try to run from too much salt. Too each his own.

Ingredients:

Rue made from 2 T. Olive Oil and 3 T. Flower

2 carrots

1 potato

1T olive oil

2 cloves garlic minced

1 onion chunked

1 thin slice scotch bonnet pepper or ¼ tsp flaked red pepper

1 inch piece shredded ginger

1 oz white wine

1 heaping T Chief Curry Powder

¼ tsp thyme

1 can vegetable broth

1 can garbanzo beans with liquid

1 can peas no liquid

Directions:

  1. Make a rue by blending 3 tablespoons of flower with 2 tablespoons of olive oil. Set aside until needed.

    Cold Rue

  2. If making this in a coffeepot or crockpot, pre-cook the carrots and potatoes. This can be done by blanching them in the coffeepot and holding for 1 hour or cooking them in the crockpot on high for about 20 minutes. You want them cooked but firm. Set aside the firm cooked carrots and potatoes until needed.

    Blanch potatoes & carrots

  3. Put the oil into the pot or crockpot if bottom heated and saute the garlic, onion, hot pepper, ginger and wine in the pot.

    Shredded Ginger

  4. Add the curry powder, thyme, vegetable broth, garbanzo beans and liquid to the pot and bring to temperature about 2 hours.
  5. Whisk in the rue until blended.
  6. Add the potatoes and carrots and drained peas to the pot and blend
  7. Cook for about 2 more hours.

Diabetic Friendly and Vegan Tomatoes and Cannelloni Beans Over Barley

December 29, 2010

Diabetic Friendly Tomatoes and Cannelloni Beans Over Barley

After a year of cooking portioned controlled meals for one or two I have come to accept that it is very easy to cook Vegan and Vegetarian meals for one or two that have great taste and are filling if you just stop looking for vegan recipes and follow your heart while modifying traditional family recipes and searching for a little more knowledge. This has now become important to me as the people I am most likely to cook for on a regular basis are either vegetarians or former vegetarians who now also eat chicken and fish. It seems that most of them have settled for fairly bland foods from vegetarian restaurants which were attempting to cut costs while using fresh vegetables by eliminating the spices.

This meal of Cannelloni beans and Tomatoes is already Vegan and was traditionally served over white rice which is actually a shame. I probably would have made in a traditional manner with fresh fennel and white rice but couldn’t find any fennel locally so this caused me to explore the web and find out how healthy the combination was and what I could do to improve the healthiness of the meal.

I found out that Tomatoes and Cannelloni beans are both excellent for a diabetic diet which none of my close friends have in addition to the beans having a positive impact on cholesterol which I have had problems with in the past. I chose four spices from the 10 herbs for health list in addition to the traditional parsley which also has incredible health benefits.

Parsley is good for a healthy heart and to protect against cancer. Basil and thyme prevent colds and coughs, garlic also reduces cholesterol and I almost forgot to mention that rosemary improves memory which is important at my age. Now to make this meal perfectly healthy and to maintain full flavor I decided to check the white rice.

Seems rice is a no-no for potential diabetics as those who eat it 5 times a week have an increased chance of diabetes. Brown rice as a substitute reduces the risk by 16% and Barley was associated with an incredible 36% reduction of the incidence of Diabetes. Since I like all three and had already come to accept this as a diabetic friendly healthy meal, I decided to serve it over barley and everything worked together for a very flavorful meal.

Ingredients:

1 T. Olive Oil

1 onion chopped

4 cloves garlic (2T minced)

1 thin slice scotch bonnet or other hot pepper. (¼ tsp red pepper)

1 T basil

1 T Parsley

1 tsp rosemary

½ tsp thyme

1 can diced tomatoes (14.5 oz)

1 can tomato sauce (8 oz)

1 can Cannelloni Beans (14.5 oz)

1 cup cooked Barley

Directions:

  1. Add oil, garlic, hot pepper and onion to the pot and sautee until glazed about ½ hour in coffeepot
  2. Remove from heat add spices, tomatoes, and tomato sauce and mix
  3. Simmer for 1 hour or more

    Add spices, tomatoes, and tomato sauce and mix

  4. Add beans and bring up to temperature about hour in coffee pot

    All in the Pot

  5. Serve over cooked hot barley

Do You Really Have to Sacrifice and Suffer Just to Eat Healthy?

No!!! This was a powerfully delicious meal and as discussed above, it would be hard to make something healthier for you that I would still want to eat.